More about Beecholme


Beecholme is also the first postwar "mixed development" housing scheme in Hackney, with a mixture of houses and flats with the taller block having five storeys and containing one-bedroom and bedsit accommodation. It is featured in Volume 15 of Hackney History and was the site of Beecholme House, the family home of Maj. John André (d. 1780), who was executed as a British spy in the American War of Independence.

Saturday, 8 September 2012

Wilmer Place Sainsbury threatens nature reserve

"Save Abney Park Cemetery Nature Reserve"
 

PRESENTS


A Guided Walk by Tree Musketeer and local ecologist Russell Miller.



   
Looking at the threat posed to Abney's wildlife by the proposed Sainsbury's 
tower block at Wilmer Place and the sustainable, sane alternatives.


Russell will be outlining the environmental impact of the Newmark Proporties 
planning application and taking people on a magical tour through Hackney's 
most ancient woodland.
    


SUNDAY 9th September


MEET 2PM 
STOKE NEWINGTON HIGH ST GATES
 

 
For details of the proposed "monstrosity" and the lack of care Hackney Planning has exercised (yet again) see Russell Miller's formal objection here
 
 
 
There is a new public consultation
so you still have time to make your views known.
Tell the planners exactly what you think of yet another supermarket - one that will destroy a large area of the visual, historic and natural environment that makes that part of Stoke Newington so attractive.
  
  Deadline for comments/objections is
16th September 
Comment/object online HERE
Application Number 2012/2228 

Details Pages for Planning Application - 2012/2228

 
• 
 

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

This all seems a bit slap-dash.
Firstly, wouldn't it have been wise for Russell Miller to see what the outcome of the developer's planning application (2012/2627) for an Environmental Impact Assessment Screening Opinion was before stating so certainly that one would not be carried out?
Secondly, what "tower block"?! If the proposal is a "tower block", then so is the neighbouring Yum Yums restaurant which is about the same height.
But don't let facts get in the way of a good Nimby rant right? I'm yet to hear Russell Miller's "sane" plan for where everyone is going to live. If you block housing in London, it'll just sprawl on to Greenbelt.

David White said...

I'm being a bit lazy here - this is my response to a very similar comment in 2011:

Some more research to give you a start
Land availability and use
Approximately 90 per cent of the population live on 9 per cent of the land in the UK.

Designated Green Belt land in England as at 31 March 2010 was estimated at
1,639,560 hectares, about 13 per cent of the land area of England.

Only 1.1 percent of England is taken up by housing.
...................................................................

http://www.propertyscam.org.uk/htdocs/fivemyths.htm

Myth #1 - Land is in short supply in England. Releasing land from special protection in green belt is the only answer. Therefore buying land in green belt locations is a good investment.

The truth - Affordable homes are in short supply in England, often in rural or semi-rural areas. However, where new building takes place in these rural areas it almost invariably has one or more of the following characteristics: It is not affordable (suitable for a first time buyer). It is not generally built on green belt land, released for the purpose, but on previously developed land like old farm buildings (farm houses, barns etc).

...................................................................

See table of land use at:

http://www.apnaland.com/greenbelt-plan.html


...................................................................


Around three quarters of Britain was ear-marked for farming after the war, which is pretty much as it is today, except that around a third of that is surplus to requirements.

Keeping all the "Green Belt" in the face of new housing demand has the perverse effect of recreating the conditions of the Victorian Slum. All over London, the policy of only building on already developed (or 'brownfield') land is leading to new overcrowding. Every spare scrap of land is being used to cram in more five-storey apartments.

...................................................................

http://www.buildinglanduk.co.uk/greenbelt-land-uk.htm

The beginning of the greenbelt was in 1935 and was established by the Greater London Regional Planning Committee. It was not until 1947, that the Town and Country Planning Act allowed greenbelts to be included in their development plans and it was not until 1955 that the whole idea was beginning to be used throughout the UK.

13% of England is covered by Green Belts. The largest Green Belt is the London Green Belt, at about 486,000 hectares. The smallest Green Belt is the Burton-Swadlincote Green Belt at just 700 hectares.

If you look around the UK, you will soon learn that the 100 richest people are landowners and property developers.
They understand that the need for housing developments is growing like never before and there is no end in site. There are very few plots of land for sale in prime locations around the UK, so they have invested well in land. They know they need to purchase land in the greenbelt areas and then just wait around for the planning permission to allow building and then they can sell this greenbelt land for a huge profit.

...................................................................
Another hint: Do a google search for "land banks +UK" and see what you get
you might be surprised

It's decades of govt mismanagement by all parties and bad policy, determined by the rich land owners (ie most senior MPs and virtually all the House of Lords through the decades) and influenced the big housing companies with very effective lobbying.
I suggest that a ludicrous reliance on the "market" (via de-regulation) to find its level while at the same time favouring a few on an uneven playing field (tax and planning law) has got us where we are today.

...................................................................

Anonymous said...

Well, in your apparent support for Greenbelt development, you are flying in the face of sound environmental planning policy. The European Environment Agency regards sprawl over Greenbelt as "the worst-case scenario", which perversly is what the "environmentalist" Russell Miller is proposing.

David White said...

No,I'm not suggesting using green belt.

BTW the gren belt is idea is for a ring of countryside where urbanisation will be resisted for the foreseeable future, maintaining an area where agriculture, forestry and outdoor leisure can be expected to prevail.

However, outside these "belts" and only in certain areas and on land that we are either paying farmers not to use or otherwise have no environmental significance, there is spce for new development.

Look at the figures (land use) - you might be surprised just how much land not used and not needed there actually is.